About your Search

20121128
20121206
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7
of the excheck kerr. >> mr. speaker, it's taking time, but the british economy is healing. [laughter] after the biggest financial crash of our lifetime, people know that we face each problem at home and abroad. at home we live with the decades of debt and the failure to equip britain to compete in the modern world. and we face a multitude of problems from abroad. the u.s. fiscal cliff, the slowing growth in china, above all the eurozone now in recession. people know that there are no quick fixes to these problems, but they want to know that we are making progress, and the message from today's autumn statement is that we are making progress. it is a hard road, but we're getting there, and britain is on the right track. >> will the chancellor resume his seat. now, look, let's be clear about this. the house knows well enough by now that i will afford a very full opportunity for questioning of the chancellor. but the more interruption, the greater the noise, the longer the session will take, and that cannot be right. so i appeal to members, please, to give the chancellor a courteous hearing as,
, it is not a recession, it has been building for decade-sapping the ability of the american economy to grow, and the average american to rise. to make the u.s. less competitive, less attractive for business, we go back to the fiscal cliff discussion over and over again because unless we get the economy really moving and growing in a long run, these budget problems will occur over and over again. we have identified eight areas where we find, these things would move the needle in a reasonable time frame, two or three or four years we start to see impact and there's quite bipartisan support. and the sustainable budget compromise. number 2, easing immigration now. we need a broader immigration reform, but it is one of the abilities to move rapidly to inject skill to the economy to fill jobs we badly need to fill to sustain our growth. it is not long term solution to the skill problem in america but a critical step we need to take to move the needle. we have got to simplify and realize the corporate tax code. everybody agrees. we just did a survey that included a loss of members of the general p
countries. i not agreebama and i on everything. these countries a share so many in common -- an economy and larger value system. we share security needs and we share security threats. when you have a relationship that close, it cannot help but be good. it has been good. i look for to four more years of working with president obama. >> you just returned from asia. you seem dead like them in a little jet lag. >> president obama is in asia. his first trip when he was elected was here in ottawa. his first trip for his reelection was asia. you both you asia as important both of you are committed to enhancing free trade. you are looking at 50 trade deals. i wanted to ask you -- when our organization was founded 25 years ago, we were founded to be a proponent of free trade. there are not enough voices on either side of the border that point out the benefits. that is why we started it. my observation is that canadians are more open to free trade than americans. their message is of protectionism. what are your observations? what do you attribute the difference to? >> in negotiations on trade agr
in one area for economy of force. they're going to be dispersed to be effective, and that requires a lot more presence. it depends on how scoped i think our national command authority says this is exactly what i want you to do with the mission set. that'll probably drive, okay, it won't be guys like me, it'll be joint staffers who are doing the real science and math on this on exactly what formations, what capabilities, and, therefore, how many civilians and military need to remain. i think that if you go to one end of the spectrum and go with just a few thousand soldiers, that's not enough to really secure yourself or do either too well. i think that's what my own research is doing. talking to a lot of smarter people in the week here in the capital region. if you go very large, you could run the risk of having the security forces from afghanistan become too reliant in those areas upon us because we're there taking care of them. i think they can be mitigated, i really do. there's got to be a really good, i think, science to exactly how you approach troops to task based upon the missions
of vehicles from new jersey to new york city, was flooded. computation is an important part of the economy and culture in that region. the damage to our highways, transit system caused severe congestion stranding new jersey and creating delays for miles. transportation in new jersey has an impact on more than just new jersey residents. sandy affected anyone who rides our rail for drive through our state or uses products. i will be working with this committee to rebuild new jersey's transportation infrastructure to make it stronger and more resilient in addition to our infrastructure in at least two cases. flooding from sandy damage the superfund sites, leading to potential release of toxic pollution into the environment. i have a letter on the way to the epa to conduct a thorough investigation of the storm's impact on sites throughout the region and i am also introducing superfund emergency response requests which requires the epa to perform an assessment of superfund sites following any natural disaster and allows congress to appropriate emergency funding to remediator any damage, also re
the economy. >>host: how about getting rid of subsidies for farmers and corporations and big oil? >> look at the republican farm bill with bipartisan support gets rid of direct payments to farmers but also with reform on the other side with to stamp use is up 40% in two years in the middle of a recovery. 41 states had more food stamp expenditures last year over the year before. there are things to be had but in terms of subsidies it is not like they get a check kumbaya they get the same deduction but it is a different business and that is one of the things to help in the united states. so to encourage production here is a smart thing. i suspect those things are on the table but the big it loophole is the home mortgage and no taxes on health insurance and charitable giving are the big three. that will be the interesting debate. . .
in the next four years who can i trust on the economy, on social issues and foreign policy. and we live in a country that is even pli divided politically and we have close elections. our victory in 2008 was a landslide. it was clear this election was going to be closer, fwiven the economy and divisions in the country. with that being said, we still won electoral college, maybe not a landslide but a clear majority. our popular vote is 3% which is a healthy margin. and i think the reason we won is people understood where we had been economically. all of you have lived through the recession. this is not something that is an academic theory. everyone painfully lived through the recession. we are beginning to recover from that. the economy has created jobs over 5 fnt 5 million jobs which our economy is far too week but the electorate said i'm beginning to feel some progress. does that mean i'm satisfied? of course not. but i'm beginning to feel some progress and i think people thought it was a risk to go back and try economic policies that led to the recession in the first place or contribut
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)